Models and Decisions Conference 2013
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Keynote Speakers

bovensLuc Bovens is professor of Philosophy at the London School of Economics. He was Director of the Philosophy, Probability and Modeling (PPM) research group with Stephan Hartmann at the University of Konstanz, Germany from 2002–2005, and an editor of Economics and Philosophy from 2002–2007. He has been the head of the department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at the London School of Economics since 2009. His main areas of research are moral and political philosophy, philosophy of economics, philosophy of public policy, Bayesian epistemology, rational choice theory, and voting theory. For more information, visit his webpage.

gilboaItzhak Gilboa is a professor of Economics and Decision Sciences at HEC, Paris, and at the Eitan Berglas School of Economics, Tel-Aviv University. He studied Mathematics and Computer Science (BSc, 1982) and Economics (BA, 1982, MA, 1984, PhD, 1987) at Tel Aviv University. His main fields of interest are decision theory, in particular under uncertainty, game theory, and consumer theory. He has been teaching a variety of courses on microeconomics, decision theory, game theory, psychology and economics, and related fields, and recently published three books, Theory of Decision under Uncertainty (Cambridge University Press, 2009), Rational Choice (MIT Press, 2010), and Making Better Decisions (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010). For more information, visit his webpage.

hahnUlrike Hahn is a professor of Psychology at Birkbeck University of London. She first qualified as a lawyer, before obtaining degrees in Cognitive Science and Natural Language (MSc, Edinburgh University, 1993) and Experimental Psychology (DPhil, Oxford, 1996). Her current research falls into four broad interlinked areas: (i) argumentation (what makes an argument that will convince a rational critic?), (ii) similarity (cognitive constraints on similarity, accounts of similarity based on transformations between mental representations), (iii) concepts and concept acquisition and (iv) language and language acquisition (relationship between comprehension and production in children, and the role of imitative learning in acquisition). For more information, visit her webpage.

strevensMichael Strevens is a professor of Philosophy at New York University. He studied Philosophy, Mathematics, and Computer Science at the University of Auckland and got his PhD in Philosophy at Rutgers University in 1996. Strevens works in the philosophy of science include topics such as scientific explanation, complex systems, probability, confirmation, the social structure of science, the nature of causation, the psychology of concepts, and the philosophical applications of cognitive science. He just published the book Depth: An Account of Scientific Explanation (Harvard University Press, 2008). For more information, visit his webpage.

tebaldiClaudia Tebaldi (PhD Statistics-Duke) is adjunct professor of statistics at UBC-Vancouver, Canada. She has been working on the statistical analysis of observed and projected changes in the climate system, their impacts on natural resources, ecosystems, human health since her post-doc years at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in Boulder, CO. After spending ten years on staff at NCAR she joined Climate Central, a hybrid science-communication organization, at its inception, in 2008 and she continues to collaborate with NCAR colleagues as a visiting scientist. Her research focus is on the uncertainty characterization of climate model projections, especially regarding the effects of climate change at regional scales and extremes. She is a Lead Author for Chapter 12, Long Term Climate Change: Projections, Commitments and Irreversibility, for the forthcoming Fifth Assessment Report of IPCC, Working Group 1; a member the NRC Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and of WCRP's WGCM. For more information, visit her webpage.